Blut Aus Nord


(Copyright © 2006 Piero Scaruffi | Legal restrictions - Termini d'uso )

Ultima Thulee (1995), 6/10
Memoria Vetusta I - Fathers of the Icy Age (1996), 6/10
The Mystical Beast Of Rebellion (2001), 5/10
The Work Which Transforms God (2003), 6.5/10
Thematic Emanation Of Archetypal Multiplicity (2005), 5/10
Mort (2006), 5/10
Odinist (2007) , 5/10
Memoria Vetusta II - Dialogue With The Stars (2009), 6/10
777: Sects (2011), 5.5/10
777: The Desanctification (2012), 5.5/10
777 - Cosmosophy (2012), 6/10
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France's Blut Aus Nord played keyboards-tinged black metal on Ultima Thulee (1995) and Memoria Vetusta I - Fathers of the Icy Age (1996), but began to introduce elements of industrial music on The Mystical Beast Of Rebellion (2001 - Debemur Morti, 2011) and especially The Work Which Transforms God (2003).

After the ambient detour of Thematic Emanation Of Archetypal Multiplicity (2005), they abandoned black metal altogether for a new gothic genre straddling the border between post-rock and doom-metal with atonal guitars and grotesque keyboards, yielding the tortured Mort (2006) and the mediocre Odinist - The Destruction of Reason by Illumination (2007).

Memoria Vetusta II - Dialogue With The Stars (Candlelight, 2009) boasted slick production and contained the nine-minute Disciple's Libration - Lost in the Nine Worlds.

The frenzied 777: Sects (2011), that marked their return to black metal, was the first two parts of a trilogy. The chaotic orgy of Epitome I fades away in a sinister labirynth of ghostly electronic sounds. The snarling distorted 12-minute Epitome IV boasts the occasional blastbeats but is mostly jarring plodding nonsense. Epitome VI pointed at the slow, hypnotic style of the future. The second installment, 777: The Desanctification (Debemur Morti, 2012), relied on a drum-machine and moved further away from black music and towards an atmospheric form of industrial metal. The hypnotic atonal repetition of Epitome VII has become the norm, and the ugly vocals simply surf it in search of a friendly riff. Even the demonic vortex of Epitome VIII nurtures solemn melodic riffs. The slow-motion closer, Epitome XIII, indulges in quasi-religious pathos with elegiac, dilated guitar phrases.

The mostly instrumental and infinitely more melodic 777 - Cosmosophy (Debemur Morti, 2012), the final installment in the 777 trilogy, was a hodgepodge of all the styles they had tried so far, simply increasing the doses of repetition and of melody, from the grandiose post-industrial crescendo of Epitome XV (the crowning piece of the trilogy) to the emphatic gothic eleven-minute march of Epitome XVIII that dissolves into feeble cosmic radiation. The gentle guitar Epitome XVI leads to a thundering theme of eternal damnation/desperation, but even at its worst the sound is now mostly a variation on arena-rock of the 1980s. The sinister and martial Epitome XIV (where the vocals still dominate) comes through like an anemic version of Amon Duul II's satanic rituals.

(Translation by/ Tradotto da xxx)

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(Copyright © 2006 Piero Scaruffi | Legal restrictions - Termini d'uso )
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