Lech Majewski



6.5 Rycerz/ The Knight (1979)
6.0 Lot Swierkowej Gesi/ The Flight of the Spruce Goose (1986)
5.0 Wiezien Rio/ Prisoner of Rio (1988)
6.5 Ewangelia Wedlug Harry'ego/ The Gospel According to Harry (1992)
6.5 Pokoj Saren/ The Roe's Room (1998)
6.2 Wojaczek/ Life Hurts (1999)
6.5 Angelus (2001)
7.0 Ogrod Rozkoszy Ziemskich/ The Garden of Earthly Delights (2004)
7.0 Mlyn i Krzyz/ The Mill and the Cross (2011)
7.0 Onirica/ Field of Dogs (2013)
6.5 Dolina Bogow/ Valley of the Gods (2019)
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Lech Majewski (Poland, 1953) debuted with Zwiastowanie/ Annunciation (1978), followed by Rycerz/ The Knight (1979), about the adventures of a medieval knight searching for the miraculous golden harp, inspired by 13th-century Polish icons, visually akin to Frantisek Vlacil's medieval hallucinations.

Lot Swierkowej Gesi/ The Flight of the Spruce Goose (1986)

In 1980 he left Poland and made Wiezien Rio/ Prisoner of Rio (1988) in England and Brazil.

In 1985 he moved to Hollywood.

The grotesque satire Ewangelia Wedlug Harry'ego/ The Gospel According to Harry (1992), about a couple living an ordinary life in a future when California has become a desert, is both environmental dystopia and theater of the absurd.

Pokoj Saren/ The Roe's Room (1998) is an adaptation of his own opera which recreates life in a decaying communist apartment complex but with the perspective of magic realism.

Wypadek/ Accident (1998) documents an art performance in Katowice (1996).

Wojaczek/ Life Hurts (1999) is the biopic of the doomed poet and provocateur Rafal Wojaczek during communism before killing himself in 1971 at the age of 26, filmed in black and white with dry Kaurismaki-esque humor.

Angelus (2001) is an Amarcord-style portrait of an occult community of Stalinist-era Sleslian coal miners, mystics and naive painters, led by a Teofil Ociepka, just before WWII who try to stage a group art show. It is also his most visually penetrating work.

Szklane Usta/ Glass Lips (2007) is based on a his video installation "Blood of a Poet".

Lech Majewski engaged in increasingly cerebral exercises of intricate skeins of symbols: Ogrod Rozkoszy Ziemskich/ The Garden of Earthly Delights (2004), based on his own novel "Metafizyka/ Metaphysics", inspired by Bosch's great painting,

Mlyn i Krzyz/ The Mill and the Cross (2011), based on Pieter Bruegel's 16th-century painting "The Procession to Calvary", an adaptation of a book by the same title written by art critic Michael Gibson, which is devoted to Peter Bruegel's painting, a detailed reconstruction of the painting itself, and Onirica/ Field of Dogs (2013), inspired by Dante's "Divina Comedia", about a young man who survived an accident, mourns the deaths of his father, his best friend and his girlfriend, and escapes into dreams where he can still meet them. These films are dialogues with old masterpieces.

The English-language Dolina Bogow/ Valley of the Gods (2019) is an adaptation of his own novel "Black Mercedes" (2016), set during World War II, starring John Malkovich, inspired by both the Hittite legend about Ullikummi and by Citizen Kane.

Lech Majewski was also a poet ("Basnie z tysiaca nocy i jednego miasta/ Tales of One Thousand Nights and One Town", "Poszukiwanie raju/ In Search of Paradise", "Mieszkanie/ Apartment", "Muzeum mojej nedzy/ Museum of My Misery", "Swiety Sebastian/ Saint Sebastian"), novelist ("Kasztanaja, Basquiat: nowojorska opowiesc filmowa/ Basquiat: New York Film Story", "Aszan Blues, Autobus na Golgote/ A Bus to Golgotha", "Szczury Manhattanu/ The Rats of Manhattan", "Metafizyka/ Metaphysics", "Pielgrzymka do grobu Brigitte Bardot Cudownej/ Pilgrimage to the Tomb of Brigitte Bardot, the Wonderful", "Hipnotyzer/ Hypnotiser"), painter and video artist. As an opera director, he staged: "Krol Ubu/ Ubu King" (1993), "Carmen" (1995), and his own opera "Pokoj Saren/ The Roe's Room" (1996). Theatre productions include: Homer's "Odyseja/ Odyssey" (1982), "Czarny Jezdziec/ The Black Rider" (1995), "Sen Nocy Letniej/ A Midsummer Night's Dream" (1997), "Opera za Trzy Grosze/ Three Penny Opera" (2002), etc.

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